Snapping at eternity and capturing life in small pixels is the fastest most efficient way to lie the truth.

 
 

First - get in, and as deep as you can. Second – there is no retirement home for war photographers, and the last and most important lesson – always be careful when dealing with Hungarians.

 

 

You cant sell news stories that have data and cautious predictions. Where is the panic? Where is the impending doom? C'mon people , give me something to work with here…

    Opinions / Science / Theory of Relative Ignorance  
 

..and as I was a yuppy marketing and advertising executive for the better part
of a decade, I am not really impressed with stories of selling your soul to the devil...

    Art & Culture / Music / Blues / Robert Johnson  
   
Robert Capa - The Original

Three things I learnt from Robert Capa in the early stages of my photographic career. First - get in, and as deep as you can. Second – there is no retirement home for war photographers, and the last and most important lesson – always be careful when dealing with Hungarians.

It`s not enough to have talent, you also have to be Hungarian."

 

Robert Capa was the symbol of war photographers. He was not the first, he was not even the best, but he reinvented the game, won it, perfected the rules, won it again, and then went out with a bang. Literally.

If your photographs aren't good enough, you're not close enough."

If I had a dime for every time I quoted that phrase to any of my photographer friends. Close enough. Now closer. That's it. There is no other way, you can never be objective, you can never really show the whole picture in any other way but to show the heart of the details, the things that a good story make.
Capa was brilliant in finding that shot that manages to tell the story, in the smaller scale, and thus , like fractal work of art, the small becomes the whole, the piece of the puzzle has the whole puzzle in it.
 
 
I hope to stay unemployed as a war photographer till the end of my life"
 

Capa was brilliant in finding that shot that manages to tell the story, in the smaller scale, and thus , like fractal work of art, the small becomes the whole, the piece of the puzzle has the whole puzzle in it.

And yes, getting really really close does help. Not physicaly, He was never a paparazzi, close to the subject. Close to the people he shot, the people he traveled with, even the people who got to see the publications.
Capa was a great photographer, but in his heart he was still a frustrated writer, which is nice, as usually it is the other way around, but in the end of the day he was always something much more important – he was human. Very human.


I would say that the war correspondent gets more drinks, more girls, better pay, and greater freedom than the soldier, but at this stage of the game, having the freedom to choose his spot and being allowed to be a coward and not be executed for it is his torture."

I know a lot of photographer. Too many. I have seen the drunken ramblings, I have see the "who got more scars" pissing contest, I have seen the twenty year old photojournalism students fall at their feet with adoring looks, just asking to be kicked around a bit, I have see the depression following being out of the battlefield for too long, I have seen the depression following being in the battlefield for too long, I have seen the families breathing out loud when a "visit" to Afghanistan is over.

I have heard so many excuses and long long long explanations and rationalizations. I can't think of more than two or three of them who are doing it for anything more than the adrenalin rush and the bar stories to tell when back in civilization. Frank capa was never part of this category of war photographers.

He was in it for the only reason a sane person should risk his life and put himself in places most people would pay anything in the world to be taken out of, he was in it for the truth. To document. To make a change.

 
The truth is the best picture,
the best propaganda."

Capa died like he was supposed to. A poetic ending after a life of hard work and worldwide conflicts. He was sent by magnum to document the Indochina war,  got out of the jeep and stepped of the trail to get a better shot, where a landmine finished his career and started his legend. He died with his camera still in his hands.

Frank capa did not want to go on that assignment.
A couple of years earlier he swore he would never shoot a war again.

Life magazine pushed him to take this job.
so we can say Life killed him.
there is a limit to what you can survive and get away with it.
EVEN an Hungarian.